Amino Acids

https://www.britannica.com/video/215060/Explaining-protein-engineering

The 9 Amino Acids we do NOT manufacture in our body

When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids to make proteins to help the body.

Break down food, Grow, Repair body tissue and perform’s  many other body functions.

Amino acids can also be used as a source of energy by the body.

Amino acids are classified into three groups:

Essential amino acids

Nonessential amino acids

Conditional amino acids

ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS

Essential amino acids cannot be made by the body. As a result, they must come from food.

The 9 essential amino acids are: histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine.

NONESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS

Nonessential means that our bodies can produce the amino acid, even if we do not get it from the food we eat. Nonessential amino acids include= alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, glutamic acid, glutamine, glycine, proline, serine, and tyrosine.

CONDITIONAL AMINO ACIDS

Conditional amino acids are usually not essential, except in times of illness and stress.

Conditional amino acids include: arginine, cysteine, glutamine, tyrosine, glycine, ornithine, proline, and serine.

You do not need to eat essential and nonessential amino acids at every meal, but getting a balance of them over the whole day is important. A diet based on a single plant item will not be adequate, but we no longer worry about pairing proteins (such as beans with rice) at a single meal. Instead we look at the adequacy of the diet overall throughout the day.

This blog is about the 9 essential amino acids that the body needs to take in.

Listed is the nine essential amino acids that perform a number of important and varied jobs in your body, with a link to the foods that provide the most amino acid.

Phenylalanine

Phenylalanine is a precursor for the neurotransmitter’s tyrosine, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine. It plays an integral role in the structure and function of proteins and enzymes and the production of other amino acids.

https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/high-phenylalanine-foods.php

Valine

Valine is one of three branched-chain amino acids, meaning it has a chain branching off to one side of its molecular structure. Valine helps stimulate muscle growth and regeneration and is involved in energy production

https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/high-valine-foods.php

Threonine

Threonine is a principal part of structural proteins such as collagen and elastin, which are important components of the skin and connective tissue. It also plays a role in fat metabolism and immune function.

https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/high-threonine-foods.php

Tryptophan

Though often associated with causing drowsiness, tryptophan has many other functions. It’s needed to maintain proper nitrogen balance and is a precursor to serotonin, a neurotransmitter that regulates your appetite, sleep and mood.

https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/high-tryptophan-foods.php

Methionine

Methionine plays an important role in metabolism and detoxification. It’s also necessary for tissue growth and the absorption of zinc and selenium, minerals that are vital to your health.

https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/high-methionine-foods.php

Leucine

Like valine, leucine is a branched-chain amino acid that is critical for protein synthesis and muscle repair. It also helps regulate blood sugar levels, stimulates wound healing and produces growth hormones.

https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/high-leucine-foods.php

Isoleucine

The last of the three branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine is involved in muscle metabolism and is heavily concentrated in muscle tissue. It’s also important for immune function, haemoglobin production and energy regulation.

https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/high-isoleucine-foods.php

Lysine

Lysine plays major roles in protein synthesis, hormone and enzyme production and the absorption of calcium. It’s also important for energy production, immune function and the production of collagen and elastin.

https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/high-lysine-foods.php

Histidine

Histidine is used to produce histamine, a neurotransmitter that is vital to immune response, digestion, sexual function and sleep-wake cycles. It’s critical for maintaining the myelin sheath, a protective barrier that surrounds your nerve cells.

https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/high-isoleucine-foods.php

Foods that contain all nine essential amino acids are referred to as complete proteins.

Listed below.

Meat, Seafood, Poultry, Eggs, Dairy Products, Soy, Quinoa, Buckwheat.

Other plant-based sources of protein like beans and nuts are considered incomplete, as they lack one or more of the essential amino acids.

These foods are some of the best sources of dietary amino acids available:

Quinoa

Quinoa is one of the most nutritious grains available today. In addition to being a good source of fibre, it contains all nine essential amino acids that your body needs from food. It also has a higher amount of lysine than wheat or rice, making it a better source of these amino acids than other grains.

Eggs

Eggs are an excellent source of protein, containing all of the essential amino acids. Studies suggest that the amino acids provided by eggs are better utilized by your body than other sources like casein or soy.

Turkey

Turkey has high amounts of tryptophan, an amino acid the body uses to make the B vitamin called niacin, which is necessary for digestion, healthy skin, and nerves. Tryptophan also helps produce serotonin, which affects your mood and can contribute to feelings of happiness and relaxation. Because they’re all high in protein, other meats are good sources of amino acids as well.

Cottage cheese

One 100-gram serving of cottage cheese provides about 25% of your daily value of protein and contains significant quantities of several amino acids, including threonine and tryptophan.

Mushrooms

Mushrooms contain a total of 17 amino acids, including all of the essential ones. One study showed that supplementing a cereal diet with mushroom would help overcome lysine deficiency.

Fish

Most types of fish contain essential amino acids and other important micronutrients. Salmon is high in amino acids and Omega 3s (important fatty acids that support heart and other health).

Legumes and Beans

Legumes are a great source of high-quality protein — 20-45% of their protein is rich in the amino acid lysine. Peas and beans contain 17-20% high-quality protein while lupins and soybeans contain 38-45%. Legumes and beans include:

Peas, Chickpeas, Lentils, Soybeans, Peanuts, Cooked kidney, Beans, Black beans, Garbanzo beans, Edamame.

Please note

Looks like there are no fruits contained in the top amino acid foods!

If you take in more amino acid than the body needs then this can be harmful and produce an effect that you do not need or want!

So we need to eat at least one of the above foods to get our daily needs of the 9 essential amino acids our body does not produce for us.

I wonder why we do not produce 9 amino acids that are essential to us?

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